Glossary
Comprehensive glossary of mobile industry terminology
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Software Development Kit (SDK) is a set of software development tools that allows applications to be created.   Access the latest SDKs from Sinch.
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This is third-party software for which we must purchase licenses. SENDXMS by default manages the four standard SMS protocols (UCP, SMPP, OIS, SEMA) and handles SMS messages as text files (MT, MOs and notifications). This software is used for sending and receiving SMS and supports a large range of protocols and SMS standards.
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A process or program that performs client requested tasks. Servers generally receive requests from client programs, execute database retrieval and updates, manage data integrity, and return responses to client requests. Sometimes server programs execute common or complex business logic. The server-based process sometimes runs on another machine on a network and provide both file system services and application services. In other cases, another desktop machine may provide application services. The server process acts as a software engine that manages shared network resources or performs back-end tasks that are common to similar applications.
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Serving GPRS Support Node - a main component of the GPRS network, which handles all packet switched data within the network, for example, the mobility management and authentication of the users.
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Singapore Standard Time (SGT) uses a time zone eight hours in advance of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), (UTC+8).
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Signature-based Handling of Asserted Information Using toKENs (SHAKEN) and the Secure Telephone Identity Revisited (STIR)) standards. The FCC explains SHAKEN/STIR as follows: “… calls traveling through interconnected phone networks would have their caller ID ‘signed’ as legitimate by originating carriers and validated by other carriers before reaching consumers. SHAKEN/STIR digitally validates the handoff of phone calls passing through the complex web of networks, allowing the phone company of the consumer receiving the call to verify that a call is from the person making it.”
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A short code that is utilized to run multiple mobile services and/or marketing campaigns simultaneously.
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Short Codes are network specific access codes used for sending and receiving messages (both SMS and MMS) between consumers and companies. Short codes are recognized for use around the world in specific countries and are shorter than a normal mobile phone number, usually consisting of four to six digits, depending on the country. Short codes are used because they are memorable and easy to enter into a phone. They can also spell out memorable brand names (phone words) (for example, 1-800-468-5865 for 1-800-GOT-JUNK), so the short code could be something like 485865 (GTJUNK).
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This message is a long SMS using UCS2 encoding.
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Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) is a removable smart card for mobile phones. SIM cards securely store the service-subscriber key (IMSI) used to identify a GSM subscriber. The SIM card allows users to change phones by simply removing the SIM card from one mobile phone and inserting it into another mobile phone.   The traditional SIM card issued by a mobile operator contains a single IMSI for the issuing operator. The IMSI is then used to authorize access to mobile networks, whether the home network or another network the device has roamed.   A SIM card can typically contain, the telephone number of the subscriber, encoded network identification details, the PIN and other user data such as the phone book. A user's SIM card can be moved from phone to phone as it contains all the key information required to activate the phone.
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An application on the SIM card that holds business logic relevant for the SIM card.
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A Subscriber Identity Module – Over The Air (SIM-OTA) is used to change parameters on the SIM card remotely.
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When a mobile subscriber opts into a program using a subscriber-initiated message to a service provider as prompted by the terms of the program. For example, when a subscriber texts JOIN HEALTH ALERTS to a short code, that subscriber is opting into the service.
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Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a signalling protocol used for initiating, maintaining, modifying and terminating real-time sessions that involve video, voice, messaging and other communication applications and services between two or more endpoints on IP networks.
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A Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Trunk or SIP Trunking is a way of communicating using VoIP rather than a traditional telephone line to  facilitate two-way conversations or multiple people on a conference call to communicate via audio or video over an IP network.   Learn more about SIP Trunks.
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